Advent Meditation

Fourth Week of Advent Meditation

 

Abbot Martin Veth, c. 1940

Abbot Martin Veth, c. 1940

Advent reminder….God will take care of you!

Jesus comes to take care of you. Benedictine monk, Abbot Martin Veth, writes, “‘Throw thy care upon the Lord, and He will have care of you’ (Psalm 54:23). He came to take care of you and all your infirmities and sins, if you will only let Him, believe in Him, and hope in Him. He will do for you. We do him wrong when we mistrust Him, the power of His passion and death, of His Mass and Sacraments. How kind of him to say to us: … don’t worry about anything — count on me and I will look after you. Behold our joy! Faith and hope in him!”

From, Custody of the Heart:  Selected Spiritual Writings of Abbot Martin Veth, O.S.B., Edited by William P. Hyland, PhD., page 14

Third Sunday of Advent Meditation

Abbot Martin Veth, c. 1940

Abbot Martin Veth, c. 1940

This Advent visualize your soul as a crib for the baby Jesus.  Abbot Martin Veth writes, “The Lord is nigh in Holy Communion.  Here our soul becomes another crib of Bethlehem.  ‘He that eateth my flesh and drinketh my blood hath life everlasting,’ said our divine Lord, and ‘I will raise him up on the last day.’  Do we believe this?  Then why be solicitous?  Let us have more faith and hope in our prayers, in Mass and the Sacraments.”

From, Custody of the Heart:  Selected Spiritual Writings of Abbot Martin Veth, O.S.B., Edited by William P. Hyland, PhD., page 15

Second Week of Advent Meditation

Abbot Martin Veth, c. 1940

Abbot Martin Veth, c. 1940

Advent during WWII must have been interesting.  Imagine the patience exercised by so many Catholic families as America united, suffered and sacrificed for freedom.  The Benedictine monks of St. Benedict’s Abbey served as military chaplains and suffered in the cause of freedom.  Christ fought for freedom too.  Abbot Martin Veth said Advent is a penitential time, “To will what God wills and because He wills it, this is the essence of patience.  Patience does no relieve us of our natural feelings of aversion, irritation, and indignation, but it controls and rises above these feelings.  Merely to grin and bear suffering in sullen silence with stoic and passive indifference is not Christian patience; we must willingly accept the cross and offer it, as Christ did on Calvary.  We must offer our sufferings, at the foot of the altar.  Our Lord felt the natural impulse to avoid suffering, but He set aside and refused to listen to this feeling:   “Father not my will but Thine be done.…Where does this patience show itself?  It shows itself in the way you put up with the many things of your daily life, sickness, death, war, persecution, mishaps and misfortunes of every kind.”

From, Custody of the Heart:  Selected Spiritual Writings of Abbot Martin Veth, O.S.B., Edited by William P. Hyland, PhD., page 9-10

First Week of Advent Meditation

Abbot Martin Veth's Advent Meditation

Abbot Martin Veth, c. 1940

Abbot Martin Veth invites us to meditate on the first week of Advent in a reflection he delivered in 1942.  The abbot wrote:  “It takes power, the power of an Almighty God, to save us from our sins and infirmities and to bring about a change in us and in all those from whom we pray.  It is hard work to “Cast off the works of darkness” (Epistle), to put to death our vanity, pride, sensuality, sloth and disobedience, and to “put on the Lord Jesus Christ” –meekness, humility, obedience, charity, religious perfection, the conversion of our morals.  “Holiness”, says St. Catherine of Genoa, “Consists primarily not in the absence of faults but in the presence of spiritual energy, grace, virtue, faith, charity.””

From, Custody of the Heart:  Selected Spiritual Writings of Abbot Martin Veth, O.S.B., Edited by William P. Hyland, PhD., page 7-8